‘Hidden Cinema’ this summer at Moseley School of Art

Moseley School of Art will welcome film fans this summer. It is hosting a 2-day ‘Hidden Cinema’ event on 23 and 24 August. Viewers will be given the unique opportunity to watch classic films in the exceptional, recently rescued Victorian building. It is part of Historic England’s on-going ‘Loss and Destruction’ season, which looks at why heritage is so important, and asks people to look again at the buildings and places in their communities, questioning what would happen if they were lost.

This is the first time Historic England has hosted film screenings inside listed buildings.

Inside Moseley School of Art

Built in 1899 and designed in “Wrenaissance” style by local architect W.H. Bidlake, the 120 year-old, Grade II* listed Moseley School of Art was the first purpose-built municipal branch of the Birmingham School of Art. It became one of the leading art schools in the area, functioning between 1900 and 1975.

Its former students include the Pop artist Peter Phillips, musician Roy Wood, Fleetwood Mac’s Christine McVie and advertising legend Trevor Beattie.

Hidden Cinema with Historic England at Moseley School of Art, Birmingham by Sam Mellish.

In recent years, the School of Art was closed to the public and underwent major repair work on the stonework and roofing, funded by Historic England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund

“This building holds an important place in Birmingham’s story as a city that has produced many cultural stars. Hosting the film screenings gives local people and the wider public an opportunity to see inside this fantastic building, which has produced world-class talent. Thanks to the funding, it can once more be a place where communities, and established and developing artists, thrive” – David Peebles, Moseley Community Hub at the School of Art building manager. 

Now called Moseley Community Hub at the School of Art, it is no longer on the heritage at risk register. It is enjoying a renaissance as a seat of artistic learning and appreciation with space in the building taken by Ort Gallery and by Birmingham aerosol artist Mohammed Ali, of Soul City Arts.

Hidden Cinema with Historic England at Moseley School of Art, Birmingham by Sam Mellish.

The Village Screen

For the event, Historic England have partnered with The Village Screen. Known for its quirky take on the cinema experience, The Village Screen dress spaces to reflect films’ themes. They work with some of the UK’s best street food vendors and musicians to bring their events to life.

Show times

The event will give children and adults an exclusive opportunity to watch a selection of classic and family friendly films.

Friday 23rd August

Dumbo: (£7.50 adults, £4.50 children under 16. Family ticket £20), doors open 2.00pm, film starts 3.00pm, doors close 5.30pm

Greatest Showman: (£7.50 adults, £4.50 children under 16. Family ticket £20), doors open 6.30pm, film starts 8.00pm, doors close 10.30pm

Saturday 24th August

Moana: (£7.50 adults, £4.50 children under 16. Family ticket £20), doors open 2.00pm, film starts 3.00pm, doors close 5.30pm

Back to the Future: (£7.50 adults, £4.50 children under 16. Family ticket £20), doors open 6.30pm, film starts 8.00pm, doors close 10.30pm

**Family ticket is: 2 adults and 2 children OR 1 adult and 3 children**

Ticket prices are subject to a booking fee. You can book your tickets here: www.historicengland.org.uk/hiddencinema

About Historic England

Historic England, is a public body that helps people care for, enjoy and celebrate England’s spectacular historic environment, from beaches and battlefields to parks and pie shops. We protect, champion and save the places that define who we are where we’ve come from as a nation. We care passionately about the stories they tell, the ideas they represent and the people who live, work and play among them. Working with communities and specialists we share our passion, knowledge and skills to inspire interest, care and conservation, so everyone can keep enjoying and looking after the history that surrounds us all.​ For over 20 years we have managed the Heritage at Risk Register, our tool for shining a light on the listed buildings and places in England that need most help.

Ruth x 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *